Categorized | North Korea, slider, South Korea

How North and South Korea Have Changed Since the Korean War


With the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II over the weekend, KEI takes a look back at what has changed on the Korean Peninsula from the 1945 to today. The three boxes compare a unified peninsula before the Korean War to North and South Korea in the 2010s. By looking at GDP, economic production, the number of radio stations, literacy and urban population, it becomes clear how far the peninsula has come in the past seven decades and how far apart its two halves remain today.

SK-NK Graphic1

Graphic created by Jenna Gibson, Associate Director for Communication Technology and Programs at the Korea Economic Institute of America, with assistance from Bradley Sancken, Jina Shin, Christopher Kang, and Lilka Marino at the Korea Economic Institute of America.

Photo a composite of photos by bradhamonds of Seoul and lawrenceyeah of Pyongyang on flickr Creative Commons.

Sources:

CIA World Factbook

38 North

“Japanese Colonialism and Korean Economic Development, 1910-1945”

Maddison Project

“The Population of Korea”

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The Peninsula blog is a project of the Korea Economic Institute. It is designed to provide a wide ranging forum for discussion of the foreign policy, economic, and social issues that impact the Korean peninsula. The views expressed on The Peninsula are those of the authors alone, and should not be taken to represent the views of either the editors or the Korea Economic Institute. For questions, comments, or to submit a post to The Peninsula, please contact us at ts@keia.org.